How to be Creative with your CV in a Millennial Generation

Being part of the millennial generation myself, I know how hard and frustrating it is to find a suitable job you want to apply for, not to mention then writing the perfect CV to accompany it!

As the economic climate didn’t favour our generation well, we have to work even harder to achieve our dream careers, carving our own path, the way we want to do it. We are the most educated generation, not to mention the deepest in-debt for this education, and most of us, including myself, are probably still living at home with parents! Yet we are tech savvy, we like flexibility and we are ambitious to move up in our career, on average only staying with the same company for 2 years. Therefore regular updates of our CV’s are essential.

This month I expect lots of millennials have attended their graduation date and will be spending the foreseeable future writing and sending their CV’s to potential employers. It is important for your CV to stand out from the rest, it’s not just about what you say but how you say it, presentation is vital! By no means am I saying everyone should have an extreme ‘outside the box’ CV, but I am encouraging you to take the time and care into writing one that accurately reflects who you are, the more effort you put in to the creation of your CV the more likely employers are to read it.

So here are a few inspirational creative CVs to have a look at.

The Resume- Ale

js1024_Brennan GleasonBrennan Gleason definitely thought outside the box when he brewed his own ale and used it as a way of promoting himself. The outside box contains his CV while the bottles display a portfolio of his graphic design work.

 

 Embroidered CV

js1024_MELISSA WASHINFor all you textile creatives take a look at Melissa Washin’s embroidered CV. It may be time consuming but it is unique and demonstrates technical abilities in it’s design.

 
 
 

 Three-Dimensional CV

js1024_odgers3Dresume_frontweb1Why not be imaginative and original in your CV creation, have a look at this three-dimensional CV idea by Sarah Odgers. This is an innovative idea that will no doubt have a dramatic effect on its reader.

Presentation Pack

Pat Schlaich is a graphic designer that created a promotional piece that was a miniature portfolio with business card and CV. This idea is fun and interactive for the reader yet it is clear and demonstrates all relevant information.

js1024_Pat Schlaich cv Fold out Envelope

Zi-Huai Shen’s  CV is a beautifully presented piece of design work within itself, he works on the idea of presenting personal visual design qualities in the work of the CV so that the interviewer can understand easier and gain more insight into personal and design abilities.­

js1024_zi-huai shen cv

Another way of promoting yourself is via video. There are many examples of video CV’s online as well as many tutorials on how to make it as professional as possible.

Check out Graeme Anthony’s video to give you an idea.

 

Here are 10 Top Tips to think about when writing your CV

  1. Keep it short and sweet, ideally no more than two A4 pages
  2. Make it well-structured and well presented
  3. Keep it relevant to the job description
  4. Don’t list irrelevant work experience
  5. Include what skills you learnt in each job that you list
  6. Don’t include passive interests like watching TV, make it interesting and diverse
  7. Keep it error free!
  8. Be clear and precise don’t use extravagant fonts or background images
  9. For creative jobs – online portfolio or website is essential
  10. Positive language, concentrate on strengths and sell yourself well

js1600_scarlet opus edit We are a positive and confident generation ready to take on the world! Have the best CV and be the best at what you do!

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Trend Seminar at Decor + Design 2014

If you’re one of our avid Australian blog readers or Twitter followers then we’ve got some exciting news for you!  We know attending one of our Trend Seminars would normally involve a lot of travelling for you, and that’s why we’re so thrilled to be able to announce that we’re coming to YOU … well, as far as Melbourne anyway.

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As part of the fantastic line-up of international speakers at Decor + Design 2014 our Lead Futurist, Victoria Redshaw, will be presenting a seminar entitled ‘Design & Colour Trends for Interiors 2015 & Beyond’ at 12 o’clock on Thursday 10th July.  During her 50 minute presentation she’ll explore the key design trends for Interiors for 2015 (and beyond) including a brief look at how we forecast design trends at Scarlet Opus.  Victoria will explain the factors driving each trend’s emergence and then discuss in detail their translation into the key colours, patterns, materials, shapes, and styles for interiors & interior products.  And then there’ll be the chance to ask Victoria questions.

This seminar will provide crucial content if you’re a Retailer of interior products, an Interior Designer, a Manufacturer of products for interiors, a Journalist / Blogger or simply passionate about all things decor + design!

We really hope you’ll come along and join us.  To find out more and book your seat click HERE.

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Spring/Summer 2014 Trend – Botanical Laboratory

Botanical Laboratory is one of our Spring/Summer 2014 trends, and one of my personal favourites! This trend is a futuristic take on carefree, hazy summer days – a fusion of science and nature redefines florals and pastels to create a fresh, cultivated and sensorial look.

In terms of print and pattern, dense and digital floral prints work in harmony with technical geometrics, biological patterns and interesting hazy and blurred effects whilst flower forms, bud and bulb shapes as well as  conical flasks and test tubes inspire product designers.

Botanical Laboratory’s colour palette is a haze of perfumed shades – diffused blush, peach, nude, clear blues and lilacs are combined with sharper acidic pastels such as  sulphuric yellow for a more artificial, scientific aesthetic. The colours gradually shift from iridescent gloss levels to chalky matte finishes.

Here you can see how to work this look into your wardrobe and your home, in my hand-picked collections for Her, Him and the Home:

Her:

her

1. Scarf by Ted Baker; 2. Sunglasses by Tnemnroda at Urban Outfitters; 3. Floral Garland Headband from Miss Selfridge; 4. Suit by Clover Canyon; 5. Spring Ring by Gahee Kang;  6. Tights by ASOS; 7. Daisy Cut-Out Bag from Accessorize; 8. Marc Jacobs Eau So Fresh Delight Fragrance from Sephora; 9. Shopper Bag by Ted Baker; 10. Dungarees from Zara; 11. Live Succulent Necklace by PassionflowerToWear on Etsy; 12. Blurred Floral Top from Topshop;  13. Lavender Sandal by Miista; 14. Eclectic Flower Necklace from Topshop; 15. Floral Nail Polish by Nails Inc (L-R) Queensgate Gardens, Richmond Gardens and Floral Street Mews

Him:

him

1. David Bertozzi by Danny Garçon for Vanity Teen; 2. Watch by Tsovet from ASOS; 3. Ladybug Print Shirt by Marc Jacobs; 4. Sunset Degrade Shirt by Vivienne Westwood; 5. Striped Classic Shoe by TOMS; 6. Tie-Dye Bars Tee from Urban Outfitters; 7. Live Rain Backpack by Lacoste at Urban Outfitters; 8. Floral Linen Shirt by YMC from ASOS; 9. Floral High-Top Trainers by Givenchy at Selfridges; 10. Green Stan Smith Trainers by Adidas from Size?; 10. Flower Cufflinks by Burberry; 11. Purple Floral Print Shirt by Paul Smith

Home: home

1. Meadow Chalk Wallpaper by Louise Body; 2. Bloom Lamp by Constantin Bolimond; 3. Aurore Wallpaper by Serena Confalonieri; 4. Test Tube Chandelier by Pani Jurek on Etsy; 5.Decorative Floral Ceramic Cups by LysaCreationDesign on Etsy; 6. Shift Cabinet by Pastoe; 7. Writing Table by Roel Huisman; 8. Big Bloom by Charlie Guda for The Cottage Industry; 9. Mawston Meadow Cotton Art Fabric by Liberty; 10. Floral Photography Print by Dullbluelight on Etsy; 11. Morning Dew Chair by Bruhl; 12. Coloured Pencil Tables by Nendo; 13. Isabel Garden Lampshade by Ella Doran

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Women Today

SP PRHello again lovely Trends Blog readers! It’s so good to be back!

A few weeks ago, Victoria invited me to guest blog for International Women’s Day. Always one of my favourite postings when I was at Scarlet Opus, I of course readily accepted. We had a bit of a brainstorm and, inspired by women including IBM Chairwoman & CEO, Virginia Romelty, and Yahoo President & CEO, Marissa Mayer, decided the focus would be women at the top of their game in traditionally male dominated industries.

I began with a quick bit of research and was genuinely shocked to discover that even at the top level, in 2012 the 10 highest-paid female CEOs in the US, collectively pulled in nearly $190 million in comparison to a staggering $609 million earned by the 10 highest-paid male CEOs.

Not long after, I joined a conversation on Twitter started by Elaine Cameron, Futurist & Director of Strategic Research at Future Perspective. Elaine had shared a link to the below video, “What the Media Actually Does to Women”, by Jean Kilbourne in which Jean invites us to look at familiar images of women in a new way, moving and empowering us to take action:

220px-JeanKilbournedr jean kilbourne. superstar lecturer

Jean is internationally recognised for her pioneering work on the image of women in advertising, helping to develop and popularise the study of gender representation in advertising. She is the author of the award winning book, Can’t Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel, whilst her award-winning films, Killing Us Softly, and Still Killing Us Softly, have influenced millions of college and high school students across two generations, around the globe.

Follow Jean on Twitter @jeankilbourne

Thinking about Jean’s lecture and this posting led me to wonder at the complexity of the period we’re currently living in where at one end of the spectrum women are literally smashing through the glass ceilings long ago put in place by men, and at the other, some of the world’s most naturally beautiful women (and that’s not to say unintelligent) are still allowing themselves to be objectified to a degree that’s arguably worse than ever, and on top of that, the majority of us (yes probably you too!) are still entranced by these images, striving to be skinnier, more toned, with bigger lips, a smaller nose, and thicker hair… the list goes on.

Jean highlights Kate Winslet’s disparaging response to her heavily photoshopped image, a perfect example of the attitude more women must adopt towards how they are portrayed in the media. Take back the control ladies, in sitting back quietly and accepting it as standard practise I wonder if we ourselves are keeping the door open for the inequalities and outrageous perceptions by our male peers still in play today:

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tracy chou. software engineer. pinterest

Tracy is a rising-star software engineer at Pinterest. Before Pinterest she interned at both Facebook and Google, turning down an offer from Facebook to become the second engineer hired at Quora. She holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and an M.S. in Computer Science from Stanford.

I follow Tracy on Twitter and not long ago read one of her tweets referring to an obnoxious comment she’d received at a corporate event:

Screen Shot 2014-03-06 at 16.47.15

Yet again, I was astounded at this attitude at such a level and so when I got in touch with Tracy I asked if this happens frequently: “I haven’t had this happen to me as much recently. I think that’s primarily a function of a couple factors: 1. I don’t go to those sorts of events as much anymore. 2. The events that I do go to, I tend to know more of the people, and they know that I’m an Engineer and that I’m serious about my work.

There’s just still a lot of bias left in the field, unfortunately. The percentage of women in the field is very low. [Latest 2014 figures record only 12% of all software engineers are female.] While it’s hard to tease out which things are correlation or causation, or the directionality of causation, the fact that the percentage is so low definitely doesn’t help people to work past the stereotypes. Many people, male and female, will never get a chance to work with female engineers, so it’s hard to start seeing us as individuals instead of a stereotype.”

SP What made you want to pursue a career in software engineering?

TC It’s a great career path, well compensated, very flexible; the work is intellectually interesting, creative, collaborative, impactful, and relevant to society.

But it was not clear to me that I wanted to be a software engineer until I actually took my first job as one, and even a year into that I was still doubtful of my choice. In college, I chose to not major in computer science because I was intimidated by my (mostly male) classmates and didn’t feel like I belonged. I eventually did a Master’s in CS, pressured by a good friend who knew better than I did what was good for me, but even after that I wasn’t particularly committed to CS/software.

[I eventually did give software engineering an earnest try] but it wasn’t easy, and I did feel lonely and out-of-place for a long time. There were certainly a lot of heart-to-hearts with friends in and out of the industry, and many tears involved. I questioned many times whether I had the mental fortitude to be a female software engineer, and I questioned whether I could encourage younger women to go into the field when I myself could barely keep it together.

It got better when I found one close friend at work, another female software engineer, and I realized I wasn’t alone. Some people reached out to me, and I reached out to some other people, and I found more kindred souls. It helped too that I got a lot more involved with the community, connecting with people on Twitter, meeting people 1:1, volunteering with mentorship programs, generally being present at events and meet-ups.

When I switched jobs, it was a natural reset and I made a conscious effort to invest in my social network outside of work. That was actually entirely sufficient for my mental health and happiness to have friends outside of work, but as the company grew and more people joined I also became good friends with a number of coworkers. If you just imagine that you’ll jive with some percentage of the population that has similar interests and/or is compatible values- and personality-wise with you, and you increase the total number of people that you encounter or interact with, the number of people that you’ll click with also increases.

SP What are the greatest challenges you’ve faced in your quick rise to success?

TC It’s very flattering that you would characterize me as having had a “quick rise to success” :)

I think the greatest challenge has been self-doubt. Impostor syndrome is well documented as a common affliction for girls and women in the STEM fields [Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics] – I have never been immune to it. This lack of confidence naturally makes it much more difficult to engage in the sort of self-promotion that is important for manoeuvring professionally; and it also manifests as a greater need for external validation, when not all environments will afford very much of that.

SP Do you ever feel your age or gender stands against you?

TC Yes. Definitely much more so gender than age, because the Valley seems to worship youth and young founders and early success.

As for gender, I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to establish trust with my co-workers now and they know me and my work, but I often feel that I have more to prove and that people still tend to apply a discount on their expectations of my abilities because I am female.

SP What advice would you give to young women today starting out in their career as a software engineer?

TC You’ll find friends, and it won’t be so lonely :) Don’t give up on something that you love and that is a great professional opportunity too.

Follow Tracy on Twitter @triketora

Despite being smart, savvy women, fully aware of the extensive airbrushing applied to the images we see in print, online, and onscreen, fully aware of the opportunities we now have to fulfill our potential as human beings – reminded of the fact by so many wonderful role models – I can’t help but come back to the point that we still strive to look exactly like the airbrushed 15 year old model!

How and why is that?!

I wonder if on the climb up the ladder, as women we fight a myriad internal and external battles, and in the process lose some of our integrity, adopting tougher, male-like qualities in order to succeed. In putting together today’s posting I contacted a number of successful women around the globe in various industries. Of the very few that actually replied and agreed to contribute, I was disappointed that only Tracy and Jean kept to their word (that’s not to say I was disappointed to only be including Tracy and Jean’s contributions of course!).

With this loss of integrity perhaps a steely, unapproachable image is also projected, as women we feel we can no longer relate and so we continue to turn back to the familiar, and what we perceive to be, more “friendly” images of women we have grown to accept in the media…

Last year I read Caitlin Moran’s, How To Be A Woman, and am proud to call myself a feminist; I can’t help but feel the battle is far from won. We must take our lead from women like Kate Winslet – speaking out against the accepted standard, and Tracy – overcoming our self-doubts and fighting to equalise expectations.

I’d like to extend my greatest thanks to Tracy Chou for so openly sharing her experiences and opinions, and to Jean Kilbourne for her fantastic work and contribution to today’s posting.

I know the lovelies at Scarlet Opus are always happy to hear from you, so do share your comments and views on today’s posting, or why not let everyone know what you’re doing in honour of International Women’s Day.

Thank you for having me back as a guest blogger Scarlet Opus… until next time!

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Oscar Film Nomination Inspired Style – Gravity

In anticipation of the 2014 Oscars (to be held on 2nd March) I’ve put together three looks – for the Home, Him and Her inspired by Director Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity – nominated for 9 awards this year including Best Picture.

Gravity is an emotional story of isolation and survival, after Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) and Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) find themselves stranded in space after an explosion of debri hit their ship. In terms of special effects, the film is visually stunning – it is incredibly realistic of the atmosphere around the vast solar system.

GRAVITY

Gravity links perfectly with one of our Spring/Summer 2014 trends: Limitless Universe. This trend is inspired by space exploration, scientific and technological innovation, and the collision of the natural and supernatural. A celestial, shimmering, digital aesthetic of light-filled colours is created with a future-modern feel. You can see elements of this in the montages below:

For the Home:

HOME GRAVITY

Above: 1. Light Space by Jade Doel Design 2. Moonlight Wall Sticker by i3Lab on Etsy 3. Astronaut Close-Up Pillow by Geography Handmade on Etsy 4. Crab Nebula Galaxy Pillow by Geography Handmade on Etsy 5 and 6. Beware The Moon Wallpaper at Rockett St George 7. Moon Night Light by Kikkerland on Amazon 8. Moonlight Cushion by Thumbs Up! on Amazon 9. Star-Forming Region Fabric on Spoonflower 10. 64 Moons of Jupiter Shower Curtain at Urban Outfitters 11. Moon Glass by Tale Design 12. NASA Plate by Classic Antique on Etsy 13. Moon Rug by ATYPYK 14. Orbit Light Sculpture by Amy Holloway Design

For Her:

GRAVITY HER

Above: 1. Harper’s Bazaar Russia Editorial 2. Seagull Moon Print Dress by Emma Cook at ASOS 3. Moon Boots at ASOS 4. Mystic Galaxy Dress by Sister Jane at Topshop 5. Galaxy Nails by Chalkboard Nails 6. Purple Galaxy Ring by Juju Treasures 7. Space Jacket by Betabrand 8. Constellation Earrings by Think Geek 9. Rodarte Fall 2014 10. Sagan Galaxy Skirt by Shadow Play NYC 11. Space Dust Nail Polish in Total Eclipse by Rimmel London 12. NASA Tank Tee by Sarmaek on Etsy 13. Full Moon Stud Earrings by Iris Jane on Etsy 14. Galaxy Print Toiletries Bag by My Wife Your Wife on Etsy

For Him:

gravity him

Above: 1. Lunar Hoody by Billionaire Boys Club 2. Luna Skin iPhone Case by Posh Projects 3. Orbit Watch by Ziiiro 4. Space Wallet by Backerton Spectrum on Etsy 5. Sprayground Galaxy Backpack from Topman 6. HYPE X Lusardi London Space Dust Watch from Topman 7. Lady Space T-Shirt by Paul Smith Jeans 8. iPad Case by Cafe Press 9. Earth Cufflinks by Juju Treasures 10. LunarTerra Arktos Boots by Nike 11. Cargo Trousers by Ralph Lauren 12. Planets Print T-Shirt by Paul Smith Jeans

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