How to Make a Good Presentation

It’s as if seminars, speeches and conferences are the ‘in way’ to attract new business today and that must be inducing a lot of stress in a lot of people.

Or has the celebrity culture made the proliferation of such opportunity a ready-made platform for fame?

Are there a mass of us in the wings, just waiting to be given the chance to stand at the podium, on the stage, or just ‘at the front’ with a ready-made, captive audience at whom we can now speak about ‘something’?

Some years ago, as I was just starting my time with the Mars group, it terrified me to learn that each month I’d be expected to make a presentation to the area management team about my own team’s results and forecast.

There were only 10/13 people in the room, I knew all of them really well, they had to do it too, they felt nervous as well. The only one of us that didn’t, was the ‘smug one’ who for that month was top of the sales league. It wasn’t that he/she had acquired excellent public speaking & presentation skills along with the sales result – just that they could at this time get away with murder, wearing their protective coat of ‘achievement’!

In the years that have followed I’ve been given lots of advice about ‘How to Present/Speak Publicly’, attended perhaps 15 courses on the subject (each one run by a world expert of course), and see the same advice/training all over the web even now.

What surprises me then, is the general standard of presentations and public speakers that I now go to see and listen to. Who am I to talk you ask? Well, I am not putting myself forward as the world’s best in this area, but I can still read, and do, all of the advice, notes, training books, and web content at my disposal. It’s easy to then evaluate the offerings against all of this.

Have you experienced any of these presentation/public speaking gaffes:

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The presenter stands in front of the screen on which is displayed information I should see

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  • The text on the slides is so detailed I can’t read it.
  • The colours used make it tough to read, they clash, are weak, don’t match the context.
  • I don’t believe it – he/she is reading the slide to me!
  • “Well, 10 minutes in and I haven’t a clue what it’s about.”
  • Should I take notes or will there be hand outs?
  • When should I ask my question?
  • Crikey, 30 mins gone, how long is it going on for? I wish he/she’d said, I’ve got to go.
  • This presenter didn’t have a clear idea of what they wanted me to take away from this.
  • Please. Please don’t hop around like that, stay still…just for a bit.

Too many people it seems to me, are placing themselves in front of audiences as the expert in their field without having given much thought to what expertise they have in the actual subject of making a presentation. It might just be me but I then can’t help but focus on what is not good about the presentation itself rather than focusing on learning something of value from a person who most likely really knows their stuff.

What a waste for us both!

Now, before you switch off thinking that I will now preach the ‘Dreamweaver’s Guide to the Perfect Presentation’, don’t, because I’m not. There are some really good tips and training documents on the subject available for free via Google. And as usual, there are already lots of people out there who can’t actually do it, but will sell you some training for you to be good at it.

What I will move onto is to express some more ‘views of an audience member’ as I have masses of experience as one. But before I do, let me say that if you want any tips on how to prepare, deliver, and then improve your skills in this area, for goodness sake send Victoria or Shelley an email requesting as such (victoria@scarletopus.com / shelley@scarletopus.com). They have delivered dozens of seminars around the world (literally), never have a spare seat in the house, and always get excellent feedback. Of course, they did have the opportunity to learn from an excellent trainer!

Now, consider this when you are in the position of delivering a presentation or speech next time…firstly, all the points I mentioned above, they are very annoying habits and will detract from your event. Now from the stalls I say this:

“Are we in the right room?  I haven’t heard a single word about how to effectively sell to women … have you?”

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  • Did you need to wear that? It’s all I can concentrate on.
  • If all you have to say is word for word what’s on the slide, please be quiet, I’m reading!
  • Is this presentation delivering what it promised, or am I in the wrong room?
  • Why is the presenter looking at the screen instead of us, doesn’t he/she know what’s coming up either!?
  • That must be industry jargon, I’ve no idea what it meant; am I the only one?
  • LOL I bet they wish they’d checked all the equipment before now!

Public speaking can be such a powerful way in which to engage with prospective clients, or entertain existing clients; they are a great way in which to establish credentials as an industry expert – the ‘go to’ industry expert; they can significantly increase your profile, confidence, and popularity.

Public speaking can also make you the last person that people go to listen to in less time than your speech takes to make.

If you go to the trouble of seeing & hearing your presentation / speech as your audience will, then you stand a great chance of it, and you, being a success.

…and, if you have any time & coffee left, here is a double ‘Dreamweaver Bonus’ for you. A brilliant video of how to make a great presentation, and excellent advice on how to be creative; starring John Cleese.

This brilliant example was brought to my attention by my US buddy ‘Whittemore’! Also a tower of knowledge for anyone. Follow her on Twitter @CBWhittemore & check out her website www.simplemarketingnow.com

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4 thoughts on “How to Make a Good Presentation

  1. Phil, what a wonderful reminder about how to do public speaking well! Thank you for including the John Cleese presentation, which is masterful – not to mention preposterous given that he ties the entire speech together using lightbulb jokes.

    Thanks, too, for your kind words.

    Best,
    CB

  2. The kind words are well deserved!
    The Scarlet Opus team look forward to seeing you in action presenting at Surfaces in Las Vegas Christine. What are your seminar topics for the 2013 educational program?
    Victoria

  3. Victoria,

    I hope that means you’ll be sharing more of your wonderfully inspiring magic! So far, I plan on sharing retailer success stories, a few best practices for online marketing and maybe some retail experience ideas…

    You?

    Best,
    CB

  4. I’ll be sharing our forecast for the 2013/14 design trends for interiors, and then translating that info right down into hard surfaces and soft surfaces. The exact timings haven’t been confirmed yet but as at the last show, we’ll then head down onto the show floor and Shelley & I will lead Trend Tours making connections between the trends presented in the Trends Hub and the Exhibitors products. I’m really pleased that Shelley will be joining us this time and her advise during the Trends Hub build will really make the difference. I’d be really interested to hear your retail experience ideas…so hopefully I’ll be able to escape and come and sit in on your session 😉
    Kindest regards- Victoria

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